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Full text of "X Collection 326"

c\t%0OCH\» 


X Collection 
INDEX 


Page: 1 




Barcode Number 


Box Number 


Total of 
Volumes 


Call Number 










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1 


-lBRRKY 

iiii urn iiiii hum 

111 

020 


Ul- H 

in inn iiiii mil 

534 ! 


)NGRES 

mi mil mil in 

329 7 


s 

IIII 


37.6 


25 J 




-IBRPR-i 

!i! iii'i'i ■"""*"' 


' OF CI 

III IIIII IIIII IIIII 


3NGRESS 

IIII IIIII IIIII mi mi 


32£> 


\?7 






020 


534 < 


)30 3 

























































■i^M 



1 




The Chimney Tops 

UNITED STATES 
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

HAROLD L. ICKES, Secretary 
NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 

Arno B. Cammerer, Director 





X-E lfaO 
Ml, 



Federal Troops Check the Confederate Advance 



4 



ESS I 



Stones River 



NATIONAL MILITARY PARK 






TENNESSEE 



_ 



- 



. 



4- 



MAMMOTH CAFE 

NATIONAL PARK 

X -^ lb0 KENTUCKY 



3 



■ ■**« 

WHwRESS 
=3ML SECQga 




Historic Entrance to Mammoth Cave 
Discovered 1799 



UNITED STATES 
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

HAROLD L. ICKES, Secretary 

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 

Newton B. Drury, Director 




■—^ 



LASSEN VOLCANIC 
NATIONAL PARK 




LASSEN PEAK FROM HELEN LAKE 

SEASON 

Open Late June to Early October 

Dates depend on weather conditions 

UNITED STATES 

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

HAROLD L. ICKES, Secretary 

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 

NEWTON B. DRURY, Director 




/ 



J 



SEOUOI/^ 

NATIONAL PAHK 




X-E 160 



FISHING IN HAMILTON LAKE "»>»•" «■">■<>» 



OPEN ALL YEAR 



UNITED STATES 
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

HAROLD L. ICKES, Secretary 

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 

NEWTON B. DRURY, Director 




) 



NATIONAL PARK 



&> 




HALLETT PEAK AND DREAM LAKE 



Grant Photo 



OPEN ALL YEAR 



X-E 160 

Mi 

Transmountain Trail Ridge Road 

Generally Closed by Snow from 

October 20 to May 30 

UNITED STATES 

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

HAROLD L. ICKES, Secretary 

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 

NEWTON B. DHURY. Director 







1 



X-E 1W 

,#6 



rfe. 



#' 



GLACIER 

NATIONAL PARK - MONTANA 

UNITED STATES SECTION 

WATERTON-GLACIER 

INTERNATIONAL PEACE PARK 

fHE LIBRARY Of 

CONGRESS 
SERIAL RECORD 

MAR. 3 01943 




SEASON 

June 15 to September 15 
Motorists — May I to October 1 5 

UNITED STATES 
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

HAROLD L. ICKES, Secretary 
NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 

NEWTON B. DRURY, Director 







Feeding, Molesting, Teasing, or Touching Bears is Prohibited 



cA-? 



YELLOWSTONE 

NATIONAL PARK 



n 



IBR«N ** 
NSRESS^ 

RECORD 




X-E IbO 



Western Ways Photo 

Old Faithful Geyser 



SEASON 

June 20 to September 12 

Motorists - May 1 to October 15 

(Dates approximate) 

, UNITED STATES 
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 
HAROLD L. ICKES, Secretary 

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 

NEWTON B. DRURY, Director 




Any Close Approach to Bears Is Dangerous 
.Feeding. Molesting. Teasing, or Torching Bears Is Prohibited 




Courtesy Virginia State Chamber of Commerce 



Blue Ridge 
Parkway 

VIRGINIA— NORTH CAROLINA 



/ 




mite 

NATIONAL PARK 



UNITED STATES 
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

HAROLD L. ICKES, Secretary 




X-E lbO 



Half Dome Towers 
almost a mile above 
the floor of 
Yosemite Valley 



National Park Service 

NEWTON B DRURY, Dir.ctor 

THf U0RARY Op 

GONGRESS 
SfRlAL RECORD 



JUN241943 




8 eatSi» 
Mountains 



NATIONAL PARK 







t 







Mammoth Cave 

ATIONAL PARK 



y^ >\K E X T U C K Y 



==J^ 




C6i&t Cut 'ueap- 



X-E 160 



-2 




*u 



enandoah 

NATIONAL PARK -VIRGINIA 





UNITED STATES 

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

J. A. Krug, Secretary 

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 
Newton B. Drury, Director 






* V 1\T ATTHM AT D A 



cmd 



(Hi 

lu 



NATIONAL PARKS 



United States Department of the Interior 

J. A. Krug, Secretary 

National Park Service, Newton B. Drury, Director 



I 




I 



.-, 







YELLOWSTONE 



X-E 160- Uio 




SEASON 



Motorist.- MAY 1 to OCTOBER t J 

(Dates Approximate) 

Hotels and Bui Service— JUNE SO 

H to SEPTEMBER 10 

*«*■ ■■■ |fc.-:' : ' mm". ".'../■■ 




Any Close Approach to Bears Is Dangerous • Feeding, 
Molesting, Teasing, or Touching Bears Is Prohibited 



X-E 160 



BULLETIN NO. 10. 






■ !j .V, 



JANUARY 1947 



PUNTS OF 
GRAND CANYON NATIONAL PARK 



.■MaeDoixdo; 







Grand Cannon Natural History Association. 
Grand Cannon, Arizona. 



X-E 160 



Jh 



® 



CHALMETTE 



National 

Historical 

Park 



LOUISIANA 




/ 



COMMEMORATING THE 
BATTLE OF NEW ORLEANS 



X-E lbO 



Wf» 




"^m.-t':':-- '* 



iU 

H 

4) 



Kings 

^Mountain 

NATIONAL 
MILITARY PARK 



SOUTH CAROLINA 



*< ' ■ — 1 







t 



X-E lbO 
ill, 






• 



'-■.■■ * /* 











x-E ISO 



Fort T) one Is oi^l , 

NATIONAL MILITARY PARK ,: 




. 



X-E IbU 



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) 




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FORT McHENRY 



NATIONAL MONUMENT 
and HISTORIC SHRINE 

The Birthplace of the "Star -Spangled Banner" 
MARYLAND 



J 



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National Monument 

ARIZONA 






X-E lbO 



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■ ■ 







asa Grand 



NATIONAL MONUMENT 




N 







Johnson 



National 
Monument 




NATIONAL 
MONUMENT 

Wyoming 




CRATER LAKE 

NATIONAL PAR 



JC-E 160 







ACCESSIBLE ALL YEAR 




i 



HAWAII 



OPEN ALL YEAR 



• 



GUCtER 

NATIONAL PARK 



X-E 160 




UNITED STATES SECTION • WATERTON- 
GLACIER INTERNATIONAL PEACE PARK 




inoky 
untains 

NATIONAL PARK 





UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE 
INTERIOR • J. A. Kiug, Secretary 

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE • Newton B. Deary, Director 



/ 



X-E 160 




Open all year 

Overnight accommodations available within 
the park only from May 16 to September 30 






*35 



m 



Isle Royale 

NATIONAL PARK 




/ 



SEASON 
June 15 to September 15 







- 



.'-- 



SEPTELBER 19^8* 



■■;' 



] 



, 





, ,- Hi ®«»wp.— i 



•V 






• 



' 



. 



GREAT SMOKY MOUNTAINS ^ 
NATIONAL PARK 

TENNESSEE— NORTH CAROLINA 






UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT of the INTERIOR 
NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 



/ 



JULY 



FREE 



NATURE 

SER 



X-E 160 

:-iti 



k- .A 




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united states 

department of the interior 

National park service 

SHENANDOAH NAT'L. PARK 

LURA^, VIR/GINIA 






X-E 160.?** 




UNCOMPAHGRE 

NATIONAL FOREST 



$tl 




U. S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 
FOREST SERVICE 



Rocky Mountain Region 




f 




- 



hickamauga Battlefield 



CHICKAMAUGA AND CHATTANOOGA NATIONAL MILITARY PARK 

Georgia and Tennessee 



X-E lfaO 





BATTLEFIELD 



NATIONAL MONUMENT 



Montana 



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o :i%sgg o ' 




/ 




/ 



X-E 160 



-te-n In 



■' 



Shenandoah 

NATIONAL PARK -VIRGINIA 




UNITED STATES 

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

J. A. Krug, Secretary 

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 
Newton B. Drury, Director 



#; 47 



I ^ MATTONAL PARKS 



X-E 1W 




United States Department of the Interior 

J. A. Krug, Secretary 

National Park Service, Newton B. Drury, Director 



X-E ISO 



V 



&1& 

Isle Royale 

NATIONAL PARK 



MICHIGAN 




SEASON 
June 15 to September 15 




Mountain 



National f-Sark 

COLORADO 





/ 



YELLOWSTONE 

1/latimal Pa*& 

f*r A C#l II Motoriffi-MAY 1 to OCTOBER 15 

NrASIIN , (Dates Approbate) 

VknVVIl Hotels and Bos Service— about JUNE 20 

to SEPTEMBER 10 




Any Close Approach to Bears Is Dangerous • Feeding, 
Molesting, Teasing, or Touching Bears Is Prohibited 



GLACIER 

NATIONAL PARK 



X-E 160 



• MONTANA 




UNITED STATES SECTION • WATERTON- 
GLACIER INTERNATIONAL PEACE PARK 




Great Smoky 
Mountai 



NATIONAL f 




/ 



t TEXJTE . :iu*r-~ 



Great.Smoky 

Mountains 

NATIONAL PARK 



-*w* 





UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE 

INTERIOR • J. A. Krug, Secretary 

IONAL PARK SERVICE • Newton B. Drury, Dir, 




YELLOWSTONE 

1/ltiwtcd Pali 



Motorists— NORTH AND WEST ENTRANCES 
May 1 to October 15 
EAST AND SOUTH ENTRANCES ^f* 
May 25 to October 15 K U*'""} 

NORTHEAST ENTRANCE dff J J 
June 15 to October 1 
1 LQ (Dates Approximate) 



E 

SEASON 




Hotels and Bus Service — about June 20 
to September 10 




wbm*A4*™_mm. 



Any Close Approach to Bears Is Dangerous • Feeding, 
Molesting, Teasing, or Touching Bears Is Prohibited 



YOSEMITE 

N AT I ON A L PARK 



A-t 



Open All Year 



u 




t 




IRRIGATION 



lwMB>i 






jOD CONTROL '' 
POWER \T'.lv.^ 

CITIES AND TOWNS 
INDUSTRIES 
SALINITY CONTROL 
FISH AND WILD LIFE 

RECREATION 

■-•. 



UNITED STATES 

DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

BUREAU OF RECLAMATION 

REGION n 








UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE 
INTERIOR • Oscar L. Chapman, Secretary 
NATIONAL PARK SERVICE • Newton B. Drury, Director 



/ 



Sf&sk"* 



* ^ lNJATinNTAT B \ Hli« 



NATIONAL 



X-E 160 




United States Department of the Interior 

Oscar L. Chapman, Secretary 

National Park Service, Newton B. Drury, Director 



' 



i * NATIONAL PARKS 




United States Department of the Interior 

Oscar L. Chapman, Secretary 

National Park Service, Newton B. Drury, Director 



X- E 160. .'Jlk 



EVERGLADES 




United States Department of the Interior 
Oscar h. Chapman, Secretary 

National Park Senric.. N.wton B. Drury, Dir.otor 



r 



X-E 16 



EVERGLADES 




/ 



; fjr>-fci United States Department of the Interior 
jSj Oscar L. Chapman. Secretary 

National Park Service. Newton B. Drury, Director 



X-E 160 



+, 



NATURAL BRIDGES 



National Monument 




X-E lfeO 




/ 






SHOSHONE 

A RECLAMATION 

PROJECT 




UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

BUREAUOF RECLAMATION 



t 







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A T 


1 O N 


A 


L 


M 


O N 


u 


M E 


1 

N T 


N 


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W 




M 


E 


X 


1 


c 


o 



SELF-GUIDING LEAFLET 




Vanderbilt Mansion 



NATIONAL 



SITE 



HYDE PARK, N.Y 




UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

Ostar L. Chapman, Secretary 

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE . Arthur E. Demaray, Director 



For some years after Vanderbilt Mansion National Historic Site was established 
visitors were conducted on a guided tour of the Mansion. Greatly increased visita- 
tion has now made it impossible to provide this service. This self-guiding leaflet 
however, we believe will enable you to tour the Mansion enjoyably and satisfac- 
torily. Each of the rooms is labeled, so that you may readily identify it in this leaflet. 
You may take all the time you wish; you may linger to enjoy whatever appeals to 
you especially; and you will find our uniformed historical aides happy to answer 
your questions. T r f. , " U/K ' 



Vanderbilt Mansion was the country 
home of Frederick W. Vanderbilt. It was 
designed and built by the firm of McKim, 
Mead, and White in 1896-98 in an Italian 
Renaissance style then popular with that 
firm. At that time, the building cost Mr. 
Vanderbilt $660,000 without furnishings. 
Mr. and Mrs. Vanderbilt occupied this 
house during the spring and fall. In addi- 
tion, they had a town house in New York 
City; a summer house at Bar Harbor, 
Maine; a camp in the Adirondacks; and 
for a number of years a house at New- 
port, R. I. Entertaining on the large es- 
tates in this mid-Hudson Valley during 
the early 1900's was usually limited to 



week ends. The Mansion is a magnificent 
example of the great estates of 50 years 
ago. 

The First Floor 
Reception Hall- All the marble is Italian. 
Large green velvet sofas and bearskin 
scatter rugs, which formed a setting be- 
fore the fireplace, have been removed. The 
top of the old Italian table is of porphyry. 
The mantel is from an Italian palace, and 
the old throne chairs around the walls are 
also of Italian origin. Two French Renais- 
sance cabinets stand at either side of the 
doorway. Please turn to your left. 
Study— Woodwork is Santo Domingo 



• V (a 



San Juan 

NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE 

Tuerto %ico 





X-E IbO.lU 



Jewel Cave 

National Monument 




SOUTH DAKOTA 




Jewel Cave is a small, beautiful, and in- 
teresting cavern. The walls of many of its 
underground chambers are lined with a solid 
coating of dogtooth calcite crystals which 
sparkle like jewels in the light; hence, the 
name Jewel Cave. Because of this unique 
formation and an attractive range of color, 
the cave and a small protective surface area 
were set aside as a national monument by 
Presidential proclamation on February 7, 
1908. The National Park Service is respon- 
sible for its administration and protection. 
The cave is available for the visitor to see and 
enjoy and at the same time it is preserved in 
as nearly a natural state as possible. 

HISTORY 

The area was originally recorded as a min- 
ing claim, known as Jewel Lode, after its 
discovery by two prospectors, Albert and 
F. W. Michaud, on August 18, 1900. 

While out prospecting, the Michaud broth- 
ers were attracted by the noise of wind com- 
ing from a small hole in the limestone cliffs 



on the east side of Hell Canyon. In the 
hope of discovering valuable minerals and 
locating the source of the wind, these men, 
in company with Charles Bush, enlarged the 
opening. 

The Michaud brothers believed they had 
discovered a cave which would be of great 
interest to tourists in the Black Hills. They 
built a log house nearby for the accommoda- 
tion of visitors. However, they were unable 
to attract enough people to make this venture 
a financial success. 

When the area was established as a na- 
tional monument, the land was a part of the 
Black Hills National Forest. The area re- 
mained under the administration of the 
United States Forest Service until April 1, 
1934, when, by Executive order, the Presi- 
dent transferred the area to the National 
Park Service. 

GENERAL DESCRIPTION 

Jewel Cave National Monument is located 
on a high, rolling plateau ranging from 5,200 




UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 
Oscar L. Chapman, Secretary 
NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, Newton B. Drury, Director 



■f 











NATIONAL PARK 

a///<?M/'a 








Blue Ridge 



wi 




/ 







Shenandoah 

NATIONAL PARK -VIRGINIA 




UNITED STATES 
DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

Oscar L. Chapman, Secretary 

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE 
Conrad L. Wirth, Director 




' 



In hot springs or steaming areas STAY ON ESTAB- 
LISHED TRAILS AT ALL TIMES; keep small children 
under strict physical control to avoid burns and accidents. 
Safe-appearing ground crusts may be dangerously thin. 




Bandelie 

| NATIONAL 

MONUMENT 

: New Mexico 



/ 



r 



Sequoia and 
Kings Canyon 






s 



NATIONAL PARKS 



. U Q 
CALIFORNIA 



Certain hazards are inherent in a wilderness. 
Falling rocks, trees, and branches rarely 
cause accidents, but watch for them. For 
your own safety, do not feed or mistreat deer, 
bears, or other animals. Streams and rivers 
may be treacherous for swimming and wad- 
ing. If you plan a cross-country hike, tell 
the park ranger; never go alone. Use com- 
mon sense and your vacation is not likely 
to be marred by accidents. 



DRIVE CAREFULLY 



n!7 




i 




HAW A I I 



OPEN ALL YEA 







illy} 



NATIONAL PARK 




N A 




SsHEnTRfrT^^T 1 ^ afeaS STAY ON ESTAB- 

S sSaof f ALI ; TIMES; kee P SmaJ1 <*"*» 
under strict physical control to avoid burns and accidents 

Safe-app ea „ng ground crusts may be dangerously thin.' 







,\W 



oo"°° - a «* 



\o'^ 






\io n 



\>& 



^ 



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ySo* 



I latlonat f-'ark 

COLORADO 



/ 



Open -Alt y ear r^» 




■ 



Us *fo 



Mammoth Cave 



NATIONAL PARK . KENTUCKY 



Open all year 




X~£ (feo 

- U Q, 



Mammoth Cave 

NATIONAL PAIK . KENTUCKY 

Open all year 




* 



■f. 



Great Smoky 
Mountains 

NATIONAL PARK 




-f^tr 



TENNESSEE-NORTH CAROLINA ^j 

OPEN ALL YEAR S^ 



4 Jft*r»* 



•U6 ^ 




.■ 




Great SmaKy 
ountains 



16a 




NATIONAL PARK 










' 




"^4 




UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE 

INTERIOR • Douglas McKay , Secretary 

(NAt PARK SERVICE • Conrad L. Wirth, Director 






Isle Royale 

National Park Michigan 







X-E Ifco 



& 



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Isle Royale 

National Park m i c h i g a 










IsleRoyale 

National Park Michigan 




*E 160 



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Shenandoah 



NATIONAL PARK 




VIRGINIA 



4 JM4 ? I 



,1**-- 




, 



x-e 140 



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?5 



Shenandoah 



NATIONAL PARK 



VIRGINIA 




/ 



Shenandoah 

NATIONAL PARK 

VIRGINIA 




fc mat I '< 

fopy.~r.1954 




K MO 

■ UG 



H 



NATIONAL 



PARK 




] \(o . x~E/&6.U(. 



NATIONAL 



PARK 





McKINLEY 



NATIONAL PARK 

Alaska 





/ 



DINOSAUR 



NATIONAL MONUMENT 



COLORADO 



UTAH 



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R 



O N 



BACK 



C U N T R '¥* 




. / 



REGULATIONS AND MANNERS 

U.S. Department of the Interior 
National Park Service 



GRAND CANYON NATIONAL PARK 



U ^ ED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 

Douglas McKay, Secretary 

NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, Conrad L. Wirtb, Direct 

Saratoga National Historical 

Self-guide Tour of 

O AK A 1 OGA BATTLEFIELD 





SARATOGA NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK is a unit of the 
National Park System administered by the National Park 
Service of the United States Department of the Interior. 
The System is dedicated to the conservation of America's 
scenic, scientific, and historic heritage for the 
benefit and enjoyment of the people. Please help pre- 
serve the natural and historic features by refraining 
from disturbing, cutting, or destroying wild flowers, 
plants, shrubs, trees, signs and markers, or any other 
objects within the park. EXPLORING OR DIGGING FOR OR 
REMOVAL OF RELICS IS EXPRESSLY FORBIDDEN 



SELF-WIDE TOUR OF BATTLE AREA STARTING AT BLOCKHOUSE MUSEUM 

■ 

2J!/ 0id T«f! intended t0 hClP YOU attai " a clearer understanding of the 
battles of Saratoga. By using this tour guide and the interpretive markers 
on the Battlefield, the visitor to Saratoga National Historical Park may 
folio* the events of the two battles and identify points of interest of 

f \, u ° f , aCti °"- lhiS leaflet is Mt tended to tell the full story 
of the battles, but should be used as a supplementary guide enabling the 
visttor to orient himself while in the Park. Persons interested in taking 
the tour will ftnd the interpretive maps and exhibits at the Blockhouse 
Museum helpful in understanding the campaign. The attendant on duty can 
supply additional information on the background, strategy, and objectives 
of the Burgoyne expedition. Illustrated handbooks containing a concise 
account of the Saratoga campaign are on sale at the Museum. 



*: 



THEODORE 



X-E tea 

! 4 SEP J ? 
[Copy—. .1953! 



ROOSEVELT 



^loj 



ISLAND 





. / 




FEDERAL 



HALL 

Memorial 




■I 




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of the Moon 




NATIONAL MONUMENT 
1 DA H O 






GRAND TETON 

""National Vark 

WYOMING &\\j\ 







•'. 




George Washington 

CARVER 



NATIONAL MONUMENT • MISSOURI 




.&6 




*IM 



NATIONAL 
MONUMENT 

Wyoming 




f 




CANYON 



NATIONAL PARK and cedar 

BREAKS NATIONAL MONUMENT . UTAH 



t 





National Monument 

Washington 




asa Grande 



NATIONAL MONUMENT 



N 




MOUNT 
AINIER 



NATIO 




'ngton ■£& £k £h 




/"£)£>* 



i White House 




•■ 




NATIONAL PARK > • • Te 



xas 




BEND 



S-jE /6 Z> 



28 







NATIONAL PARK 



• • • 



Texas 




NATIONAL MONUMENT 

California 



t 




NATIONAL MONUMENT 

California 








t 



'4 "0C7 J o7. (^ ^ 




Castle 



CLINTON 



# 



lO<7 




%f.-^'-2 



y 






NATIONAL MONUMENT 
New York 





M. tea 



Castle 



CLINTON 



4h-\ 

W L- 



9 1 



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NATIONAL MONUMENT 
New York 



■ i 




fuUv ° bse ' V «« o. fc»» 5p, ^cp YOUR CH "" „. y places, 

" a,k ° n - zv*D OTHER LARGt yE T H 

BEARS^'^DAtjg^THEM. 



Xe f- ua 



' 







WINTER SEASON— DECEMBER 1 TO APRIL 30— 
Full Operation 

SUMMER SEASON— MAY 1 TO NOVEMBER 30— 
Restricted Operation 






C*fr 




National 

Seashore 

Recreational 



Area 



NORTH CAROLINA 



n 




OPEN ALL YEAR 



1 4 JULJtitf-E _HB 
$ Copsr^u — 2954 1 06 




GLACIER 

NATIONAL P #'A ft6 

*\S) • MON 




Of Jmk 




GLACIER 

NATIONAL PARK 

*uc, m - MONTANA 




/ 



UNITED STATES SECTION • WATERTON- 
GLACIER INTERNATIONAL PEACE PARK 



(MAP INSIDE) X-E-16(f. 




^-^blATIONAL PARK 






(MAP INSIDE) 

X-E 1 60 




NATIONAL PARK 




<$ 



Sequoia and * n 
Kings Canyon 



\v> 



NATIONAL PARKS . CALIFORNIA 




Certain hazards are inherent in a wilderness. 
Falling rocks, trees, and branches rarely 
cause accidents, but watch for them. For 
your own safety, do not feed or mistreat deer, 
bears, or other animals. Streams and rivers 
may be treacherous for swimming and wad- 
ing. If you plan a cross-country hike, tell 
the park ranger; never go alone. Use com- 
mon sense and your vacation is not likely 
to be marred by accidents. 

DRIVE CAREFULLY 




Sequoia and 
Kings Canyon 




NATIONAL PARKS 



CALIFORNIA 



Certain hazards are inherent in a wilderness. 
Falling rocks, trees, and branches rarely 
cause accidents, but watch for them. For 
your own safety, do not feed or mistreat deer, 
bears, or other animals. Streams and rivers 
may be treacherous for swimming and wad- 
ing. If you plan a cross-country hike, tell 
the park ranger; never go alone. Use com- 
mon sense and your vacation is not likely 
to be marred by accidents. 






DRIVE CAREFULLY 




San Juan 

NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE 

Tuerto l^ico 




, 




NATIONAL PARK 



Colorado 



m - 




■'. 



THEODORE 



X-E HO 

U6 



m 



ROOSEVELT 




■• 



X-E HO 
U6 

PART OF THE GEORGE WASHINGTON MEMORIAL PARKWAY 



W A 



y 




/ 



4 JUn J '* 



VIRGINIA AND DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 

NATIONAL CAPITAL PARKS 
WASHINGTON. D. C. 




National Military Park 

MISSISSIPPI 




/ 



■-'. 






Fort "Donelson 




12 
2 



*KL 



NATIONAL MILITARY PARK 




9 



X-E HO' j» 

m 



T)eath %Jalley 

NATIONAL MONUMENT £ i H -2 



NEVADA 




/ 



ennesaw Mountain H ° 




GEORGIA 



Qhalmette 





/ 



ft Commemorating the Battle of New Orleans ft 



CEDAR BREAKS *\% 



National Monument • Utah 




Situated high on the Markagunt Pla- 
teau in southwest Utah at elevations 
reaching 10,700 feet, Cedar Breaks National 
Monument contains a gigantic multicolored 
natural amphitheater. The Pink Cliffs, a 
part of the Wasatch formation, have a thick- 
ness here of nearly 2,000 feet. They ex- 
hibit fantastic erosional features and display 
an amazing variety of color. 47 different 
shades having been recognized. With ever- 
changing tints of the vividly colored rock 
formations, sweeping vistas, and attractive 
wildflowers, Cedar Breaks National Monu- 
ment offers superlative scenic values. One 
of the most spectacular views is from nearby 
Brianhead, which has an elevation of 11,315 
feet. 

The monument is located 21 miles east of 
Cedar City, Utah, and is surrounded by 



Dixie National Forest. It embraces an area 
of 6,172.20 acres, two-thirds of which con- 
sist of high cliffs and steep talus slopes. 

Since cedar trees are not evident in the 
area, the name "Cedar Breaks" is confusing 
to many visitors. Junipers, which the early 
settlers called "cedars," grow nearby, but at 
elevations considerably below the rim of the 
amphitheater. The settlers also referred to 
the canyons and cliffs as "breaks" or "bad- 
lands." 

HISTORY 

Early exploration of the Markagunt Pla- 
teau began in 1851 when the Mormons 
settled in Parowan and Cedar City, in the 
valley to the west. In 1852, church leaders 
explored the headwaters of the Sevier and 



Photo: Amphitheater from Point Supreme (Courtesy, Union Pacific RR.) 



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MISSISSIPPI 
NORTH CAROLS 
TENNESSEE 



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